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October

What reading experts say:
Letter recognition is an important prerequisite to learning to read. Successful beginning readers have a good knowledge of the alphabet, know letter names and understand that letters represent sounds.

Draw your child's attention to the visual form of individual letters in many different ways that are fun for you and your child.

Being able to recognize and name letters of the alphabet at entry into kindergarten is a strong predictor of reading ability in 10th grade. Ehri, L. and McCormick, S. Phases of word learning: Implications for instruction with delayed and disabled reader, Reading and Writing Quarterly.

What good readers know:
Good readers understand that letters are different from one another and that each letter has a name and its own distinct sound. To be ready to read, children should know the alphabet song, upper case and most lower case letters and know the sounds each letter makes. to finish the paragraph.

To be ready to read, children should know the alphabet song, upper case and most lower case letters and know the sounds each letter makes.

What parents can do to help children Grow Up Reading™:
Week 1:
Tell your child a story about your first day of school. Be expressive. Use new words your child does not know. Ask questions and respond to your child's answers.
Week 2:
Read five books from the "Talking" booklist. Remember to make a tally mark for each book. Do this every month!
Week 3:
Attend one of the Library's virtual storytimes. These storytimes promote reading, singing, dancing, counting, talking and movement. Check out the Library's event calendar for more details.
Week 4:
Play "I Spy" with numbers on the calendar. Say, "I Spy with my little eye, a number that is more than 8 but less than 10."

Activities - Talking:
  1. Use words that promote directionality or spatial awareness such as (over, under, next to, in back of or on top. Model and encourage your child to describe words in their vocabulary.
  2. While shopping for groceries, discuss what you will buy, how many you need, and what you will make. Discuss the size (large or small), shape (long, round, square), and weight (heavy or light) of the packages.
  3. Make up tongue twisters using the first letter in your child's name and play other games using alliteration. Funny sentences, like "Tommy tickled two tigers," help children recognize similar sounds, an important skill for reading.

More Great Books to Read(click on a title to check for availability at the Library)